Differences Between Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes

The pancreas, an endocrine gland, produces one of the body’s most important hormones, insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels by allowing cells to accept glucose (sugar) for use as energy. In individuals with diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce insulin. The lack of insulin in the body raises blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia), which can lead to kidney problems, liver problems, vascular disease coma or even death.

Type I Classification

The majority of individuals with Type I diabetes develop the disease as children. Diabetes develops because the lost beta cells in the Islets of Langerhans within the pancreas prohibit insulin production. Individuals with Type I diabetes must be on the lookout for skin disorders, nerve damage in the feet, eye care and maintain good dental health.

Type II Classification

Individuals with Type II diabetes develop the disease through a combination of genetics, poor diet and lack of exercise. The pancreas releases insulin to lower blood sugar levels. Excess fat around the muscles can block the absorption of glucose, making the body insulin-resistant. The glucose remains in the bloodstream, raising blood sugar levels and causing the pancreas to release more insulin. The cycle continues until the body becomes completely immune to the effects of insulin.

Type I Prevention/Solution

Since the beta cells no longer produce insulin, the body must get it from other sources to survive. Insulin cannot be taken orally, as it would be broken down during digestion. Without insulin, the body cannot use glucose for energy; therefore, insulin must be injected into the fat under the skin. Most insulin injections are made from synthetic sources, and a few are made from pigs. Extreme cases can be treated with insulin pumps. Pumps deliver insulin through a catheter placed under the skin.

Type II Prevention/Solution

Type II diabetes develops from insulin resistance. Insulin sensitivity can be restored with modest weight loss; as little as 10 to 15 lbs. can make a difference. Over 90 percent of individuals who lose weight and keep it off do it through a combination of diet and exercise. Until insulin sensitivity is restored, individuals with Type II diabetes may have to take insulin injections.

Misconceptions

Diabetics are no more likely to get the common cold and flu than any other individual. Colds raise blood sugar levels and can be dangerous for diabetics; diabetes does not affect the immune system and is not contagious. Diabetes does not create athersclerosis (hardening of the arteries). However, an obese Type II diabetic is at a greater risk of atherosclerosis than the rest of the population.

How to Prevent Allergy Burning of Eyes

Allergies affect 40 to 50 million Americans, according to the American Academy of Allergy and Asthma Immunology (AAAAI). Each person reacts differently to allergies. Some people experience skin reactions such as hives and rashes, while others react with burning and itchy eyes. Prevention is the best way to treat any allergy. There are both natural and medical ways to prevent allergy burning of eyes.

Instructions

Allergy-Free Eyes

  1. Avoid whatever causes your eyes to burn. If it is certain foods, avoid them, or if it’s dust, keep your house clean. Stay indoors where the air is filtered and recycled to avoid allergens found in outdoor air. Keep a close watch on what you eat, drink and expose yourself to.
  2. Take an oral antihistamine to prevent burning of the eyes. Take Benadryl if your allergy occurs in response to isolated events. Take an over-the-counter 24-hour antihistamine such as Claritin or Zyrtec if the allergy is ongoing and consistent. Use antihistamine eye drops before leaving the house to prevent outdoor allergies from affecting your eyes. Drink plenty of water while taking antihistamines, as they dry up mucus in the body.
  3. Use saline drops in each eye to prevent irritated, burning eyes. Place two drops in each eye, three to five times a day. to cleanse the eye and keep it moistened. Apply the drops in the morning, afternoon and evening for the best results.
  4. Use a saline rinse with an eye cup. Buy an eye cup and saline solution from the local pharmacy. Fill the eye cup half-full with the saline solution. Hold the cup over a sink and lower your head to fit your surrounding eye area over the eye cup. Cock your head all the way back so the liquid is on your eyelid. Open your eye and move your eyeball from side to side for 20 to 30 seconds. Tilt your head back down over the sink and remove the eye cup. Clean the eye cup thoroughly with soap and water and repeat on the other eye. Repeat this process two or three times daily.